Inspiration & Wonders

sagansense:

'Sup. I'm a Mantodea. You may know me better by my other name, Mantis. 

It’s cool. I’ll explain. 

In the 1800’s - 1838 actually - Hermann Burmeister (a German entomologist) coined this awesome name through the word mantodea, courtesy of the Ancient Greek words μάντις and εἶδος or “mantis" (meaning "prophet") and "type”…sh’yeah…pretty damn cool, right?

Let me tell you how cool this actually is.

There’s about 2,400 species of us and around 430 genera amidst 15 different families around this planet. Although most of us are in the family Mantidae, we have a large family…

Acanthopidae
Amorphoscelididae
Chaeteessidae
Empusidae
Eremiaphilidae
Hymenopodidae
Iridopterygidae
Liturgusidae
Mantidae
Mantoididae
Metallyticidae
Sibyllidae
Tarachodidae
Thespidae
Toxoderidae

OH yeah. We’re a pretty big deal.

Our relatives, the termites and cockroaches…Blattodea, man…they have survival instincts like you wouldn’t believe. Hardly has to do with their instincts, however; it comes down to their anatomy and cellular cycles.

Let me just come out and say it…my body is pretty dope. I mean, look at these legs…x
…that’s what you call a raptorial appendage. Why? Because when we got you, we GOT YOU. “Raptorial” is usually used to describe the talons on “birds of prey.” I told you, this is serious.

You may be familiar with this predatory mechanism in our pals the Mantis Shrimp:
Yeah. They’re pretty dope too. You can learn more about them HERE.

So. We’re small. I get that. But our visual acuity is RIDICULOUS. 

Our compound eyes are comprised of up to 10,000 photon receptor cells in a cluster called an ommatidium, which are laterally spaced, providing us a long-range binocular field of vision (up to 20 metres, my friend), and precision stereoscopic vision up close. Way close.

x

Not familiar with these vision types? Peep the below example of an owl vs a pigeon…
Yeah. Humans? Pshh. Monocular vision. How’s that going to help you when you have a hawk approaching you from above? Well. I guess you don’t have to worry about that….but we do! And our vision is boss.

Speaking of predators, we don’t usually encounter many, because most of us hunt by night. However, bats are a thing, and because of their precision hunting skills, we have a better thing: an auditory thoracic organ…

WE CAN EVADE BATS BECAUSE WE CAN DETECT THEIR ECHOLOCATION.

That’s right. 

Listen, I have to go, it’s getting dark soon and I don’t want to be late again for the frog ambush tonight.

If you want to learn more about our anatomy, diet, predatory behavior, wicked awesome defensive strategies via camouflage, or the slimy details of our reproductive history - like sexual cannabalism, if you’re into that sort of thing - Wikipedia has plenty for you to browse through. 

You can watch this epic video of one of my bros, the documentary MANTIS (which is super thorough and dispels some myths about us you may want to tune in for), and most definitely, watch “True Facts About The Mantis.”

Oh, and don’t call us “praying" mantises anymore, ok? That’s not a thing. It’s insulting to our evolutionary lineage. And if you call us that to our faces, you may be the one praying you hadn’t.

x

Stay curious, humanoids. View Larger

sagansense:

'Sup. I'm a Mantodea. You may know me better by my other name, Mantis.

It’s cool. I’ll explain.

In the 1800’s - 1838 actually - Hermann Burmeister (a German entomologist) coined this awesome name through the word mantodea, courtesy of the Ancient Greek words μάντις and εἶδος or mantis" (meaning "prophet") and "type…sh’yeah…pretty damn cool, right?

Let me tell you how cool this actually is.

There’s about 2,400 species of us and around 430 genera amidst 15 different families around this planet. Although most of us are in the family Mantidae, we have a large family…

Acanthopidae
Amorphoscelididae
Chaeteessidae
Empusidae
Eremiaphilidae
Hymenopodidae
Iridopterygidae
Liturgusidae
Mantidae
Mantoididae
Metallyticidae
Sibyllidae
Tarachodidae
Thespidae
Toxoderidae

OH yeah. We’re a pretty big deal.

Our relatives, the termites and cockroaches…Blattodea, man…they have survival instincts like you wouldn’t believe. Hardly has to do with their instincts, however; it comes down to their anatomy and cellular cycles.

Let me just come out and say it…my body is pretty dope. I mean, look at these legs…
x
…that’s what you call a raptorial appendage. Why? Because when we got you, we GOT YOU. “Raptorial” is usually used to describe the talons on “birds of prey.” I told you, this is serious.

You may be familiar with this predatory mechanism in our pals the Mantis Shrimp:

Yeah. They’re pretty dope too. You can learn more about them HERE.

So. We’re small. I get that. But our visual acuity is RIDICULOUS.

Our compound eyes are comprised of up to 10,000 photon receptor cells in a cluster called an ommatidium, which are laterally spaced, providing us a long-range binocular field of vision (up to 20 metres, my friend), and precision stereoscopic vision up close. Way close.

x

Not familiar with these vision types? Peep the below example of an owl vs a pigeon…

Yeah. Humans? Pshh. Monocular vision. How’s that going to help you when you have a hawk approaching you from above? Well. I guess you don’t have to worry about that….but we do! And our vision is boss.

Speaking of predators, we don’t usually encounter many, because most of us hunt by night. However, bats are a thing, and because of their precision hunting skills, we have a better thing: an auditory thoracic organ…

WE CAN EVADE BATS BECAUSE WE CAN DETECT THEIR ECHOLOCATION.

That’s right.

Listen, I have to go, it’s getting dark soon and I don’t want to be late again for the frog ambush tonight.

If you want to learn more about our anatomy, diet, predatory behavior, wicked awesome defensive strategies via camouflage, or the slimy details of our reproductive history - like sexual cannabalism, if you’re into that sort of thing - Wikipedia has plenty for you to browse through.

You can watch this epic video of one of my bros, the documentary MANTIS (which is super thorough and dispels some myths about us you may want to tune in for), and most definitely, watch “True Facts About The Mantis.

Oh, and don’t call us “praying" mantises anymore, ok? That’s not a thing. It’s insulting to our evolutionary lineage. And if you call us that to our faces, you may be the one praying you hadn’t.

x

Stay curious, humanoids.


rollership:

byron130: 18.05.2014
I learned yesterday that when you see a bee on the ground that isn’t moving, it’s not necessarily dead, it’s probably just dead tired from carrying lots of pollen and needs re-energising. So if you mix a tiny bit of water with some sugar and let it drink it will give it the boost it needs to continue on its way. Bizarrely, this exact thing happened today! I found a knackered bee, mixed up some sugar water, gave it a drink and watched it guzzle and guzzle then suddenly come back to life. It was amazing! Thank you patrick, it was an excellent tip that i’ll never forget and will continue to pass on to others! View Larger

rollership:

byron13018.05.2014

I learned yesterday that when you see a bee on the ground that isn’t moving, it’s not necessarily dead, it’s probably just dead tired from carrying lots of pollen and needs re-energising. So if you mix a tiny bit of water with some sugar and let it drink it will give it the boost it needs to continue on its way. Bizarrely, this exact thing happened today! I found a knackered bee, mixed up some sugar water, gave it a drink and watched it guzzle and guzzle then suddenly come back to life. It was amazing! Thank you patrick, it was an excellent tip that i’ll never forget and will continue to pass on to others!


jtotheizzoe:

The (West Antarctic Ice) Sheet Has Hit The Fan
Well, now we’ve done it.
This week, two scientific teams reported that the collapse and melt of large portions of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet now appears unstoppable. As in irreversible, inevitable, and more than partially our fault. There’s enough water in the unstable ice sheet to raise global sea levels by four feet on its own, and combined with other sources of melt, this could raise sea levels as much as ten feet over the next few centuries. 
I’ll give you a moment, in case that didn’t sink in.
As Chris Mooney writes at Mother Jones, “This is what a holy shit moment for global warming looks like.”
The acceleration of the ice sheet’s melting is due to warming ocean currents, destabilizing the ice from beneath and speeding up its collapse. Because of the particular geography of the region, this rapid chain reaction of melting can not be stopped. If greenhouse gas levels continue to rise, this melting will only speed up.
If there’s any silver lining to this news, it’s that it’s not clear how fast this will happen. Ice sheets move slowly (being made of ice and all), so the melt could play out over hundreds of years. Still, it’s the clearest sign yet that we have irreversibly affected the global climate, and we must do something.
Every day that we spend faux-debating the validity of climate change science is another day closer to an inevitably wet future. Would you rather build a boat or tread water?
For more coverage, check out the NY Times, these two pages from NASA, or just Google “West Antarctic Ice Sheet oh shit we’re fucked”
PS - The image up top shows what Times Square would look like with 6 feet or so of sea level rise. Just so you know what to expect. Check out more at worldunderwater.org

jtotheizzoe:

The (West Antarctic Ice) Sheet Has Hit The Fan

Well, now we’ve done it.

This week, two scientific teams reported that the collapse and melt of large portions of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet now appears unstoppable. As in irreversible, inevitable, and more than partially our fault. There’s enough water in the unstable ice sheet to raise global sea levels by four feet on its own, and combined with other sources of melt, this could raise sea levels as much as ten feet over the next few centuries. 

I’ll give you a moment, in case that didn’t sink in.

As Chris Mooney writes at Mother Jones, “This is what a holy shit moment for global warming looks like.”

The acceleration of the ice sheet’s melting is due to warming ocean currents, destabilizing the ice from beneath and speeding up its collapse. Because of the particular geography of the region, this rapid chain reaction of melting can not be stopped. If greenhouse gas levels continue to rise, this melting will only speed up.

If there’s any silver lining to this news, it’s that it’s not clear how fast this will happen. Ice sheets move slowly (being made of ice and all), so the melt could play out over hundreds of years. Still, it’s the clearest sign yet that we have irreversibly affected the global climate, and we must do something.

Every day that we spend faux-debating the validity of climate change science is another day closer to an inevitably wet future. Would you rather build a boat or tread water?

For more coverage, check out the NY Times, these two pages from NASA, or just Google “West Antarctic Ice Sheet oh shit we’re fucked”

PS - The image up top shows what Times Square would look like with 6 feet or so of sea level rise. Just so you know what to expect. Check out more at worldunderwater.org


link: ( http://g-sin.tumblr.com )