Inspiration & Wonders

txchnologist:


The world’s first 3-D printed car took to the streets this weekend after being built in an amazingly short 44 hours. The vehicle, called Strati, was designed by Italian designer Michele Anoé, who won an international competition held by crowdsourcing carmaker Local Motors.  It was printed and rapidly assembled by a Local Motors team during a manufacturing technology show held last week in Chicago, then went on a drive on Saturday. 
Strati’s chassis and body were made in one piece out of a carbon fiber-impregnated plastic on a large-area 3-D printer. The machine put down layer after layer of the material at a rate of 40 pounds per hour.
Continue reading…txchnologist:


The world’s first 3-D printed car took to the streets this weekend after being built in an amazingly short 44 hours. The vehicle, called Strati, was designed by Italian designer Michele Anoé, who won an international competition held by crowdsourcing carmaker Local Motors.  It was printed and rapidly assembled by a Local Motors team during a manufacturing technology show held last week in Chicago, then went on a drive on Saturday. 
Strati’s chassis and body were made in one piece out of a carbon fiber-impregnated plastic on a large-area 3-D printer. The machine put down layer after layer of the material at a rate of 40 pounds per hour.
Continue reading…txchnologist:


The world’s first 3-D printed car took to the streets this weekend after being built in an amazingly short 44 hours. The vehicle, called Strati, was designed by Italian designer Michele Anoé, who won an international competition held by crowdsourcing carmaker Local Motors.  It was printed and rapidly assembled by a Local Motors team during a manufacturing technology show held last week in Chicago, then went on a drive on Saturday. 
Strati’s chassis and body were made in one piece out of a carbon fiber-impregnated plastic on a large-area 3-D printer. The machine put down layer after layer of the material at a rate of 40 pounds per hour.
Continue reading…

txchnologist:

The world’s first 3-D printed car took to the streets this weekend after being built in an amazingly short 44 hours. The vehicle, called Strati, was designed by Italian designer Michele Anoé, who won an international competition held by crowdsourcing carmaker Local Motors.  It was printed and rapidly assembled by a Local Motors team during a manufacturing technology show held last week in Chicago, then went on a drive on Saturday. 

Strati’s chassis and body were made in one piece out of a carbon fiber-impregnated plastic on a large-area 3-D printer. The machine put down layer after layer of the material at a rate of 40 pounds per hour.

Continue reading…


txchnologist:


Next-Generation Satellite Dissects Storms From Top To Bottom
Meteorologists are getting a whole new view of the weather systems that bring rain, snow and ice thanks to an instrument launched into orbit earlier this year. The next-generation Global Precipitation Measurement satellite and a constellation of other observatories and relays scan the entire globe every three hours to send back an avalanche of data.
Read more and see the video below.
Read Moretxchnologist:


Next-Generation Satellite Dissects Storms From Top To Bottom
Meteorologists are getting a whole new view of the weather systems that bring rain, snow and ice thanks to an instrument launched into orbit earlier this year. The next-generation Global Precipitation Measurement satellite and a constellation of other observatories and relays scan the entire globe every three hours to send back an avalanche of data.
Read more and see the video below.
Read Moretxchnologist:


Next-Generation Satellite Dissects Storms From Top To Bottom
Meteorologists are getting a whole new view of the weather systems that bring rain, snow and ice thanks to an instrument launched into orbit earlier this year. The next-generation Global Precipitation Measurement satellite and a constellation of other observatories and relays scan the entire globe every three hours to send back an avalanche of data.
Read more and see the video below.
Read More

txchnologist:

Next-Generation Satellite Dissects Storms From Top To Bottom

Meteorologists are getting a whole new view of the weather systems that bring rain, snow and ice thanks to an instrument launched into orbit earlier this year. The next-generation Global Precipitation Measurement satellite and a constellation of other observatories and relays scan the entire globe every three hours to send back an avalanche of data.

Read more and see the video below.

Read More


… may say that as a service economy we are henceforth so far removed from the realities of production and work on the world that we inhabit a dream world of artificial stimuli and televised experience.

-Fredric Jameson View Larger

… may say that as a service economy we are henceforth so far removed from the realities of production and work on the world that we inhabit a dream world of artificial stimuli and televised experience.

-Fredric Jameson


nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)
nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)
nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)
nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)
nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)
nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)
nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)
nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)
nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)

nubbsgalore:

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)


neurosciencestuff:

Tiny chip mimics brain, delivers supercomputer speed
Researchers Thursday unveiled a powerful new postage-stamp size chip delivering supercomputer performance using a process that mimics the human brain.

The so-called “neurosynaptic” chip is a breakthrough that opens a wide new range of computing possibilities from self-driving cars to artificial intelligence systems that can installed on a smartphone, the scientists say.
The researchers from IBM, Cornell Tech and collaborators from around the world said they took an entirely new approach in design compared with previous computer architecture, moving toward a system called “cognitive computing.”
"We have taken inspiration from the cerebral cortex to design this chip," said IBM chief scientist for brain-inspired computing, Dharmendra Modha, referring to the command center of the brain.
Read moreneurosciencestuff:

Tiny chip mimics brain, delivers supercomputer speed
Researchers Thursday unveiled a powerful new postage-stamp size chip delivering supercomputer performance using a process that mimics the human brain.

The so-called “neurosynaptic” chip is a breakthrough that opens a wide new range of computing possibilities from self-driving cars to artificial intelligence systems that can installed on a smartphone, the scientists say.
The researchers from IBM, Cornell Tech and collaborators from around the world said they took an entirely new approach in design compared with previous computer architecture, moving toward a system called “cognitive computing.”
"We have taken inspiration from the cerebral cortex to design this chip," said IBM chief scientist for brain-inspired computing, Dharmendra Modha, referring to the command center of the brain.
Read moreneurosciencestuff:

Tiny chip mimics brain, delivers supercomputer speed
Researchers Thursday unveiled a powerful new postage-stamp size chip delivering supercomputer performance using a process that mimics the human brain.

The so-called “neurosynaptic” chip is a breakthrough that opens a wide new range of computing possibilities from self-driving cars to artificial intelligence systems that can installed on a smartphone, the scientists say.
The researchers from IBM, Cornell Tech and collaborators from around the world said they took an entirely new approach in design compared with previous computer architecture, moving toward a system called “cognitive computing.”
"We have taken inspiration from the cerebral cortex to design this chip," said IBM chief scientist for brain-inspired computing, Dharmendra Modha, referring to the command center of the brain.
Read moreneurosciencestuff:

Tiny chip mimics brain, delivers supercomputer speed
Researchers Thursday unveiled a powerful new postage-stamp size chip delivering supercomputer performance using a process that mimics the human brain.

The so-called “neurosynaptic” chip is a breakthrough that opens a wide new range of computing possibilities from self-driving cars to artificial intelligence systems that can installed on a smartphone, the scientists say.
The researchers from IBM, Cornell Tech and collaborators from around the world said they took an entirely new approach in design compared with previous computer architecture, moving toward a system called “cognitive computing.”
"We have taken inspiration from the cerebral cortex to design this chip," said IBM chief scientist for brain-inspired computing, Dharmendra Modha, referring to the command center of the brain.
Read moreneurosciencestuff:

Tiny chip mimics brain, delivers supercomputer speed
Researchers Thursday unveiled a powerful new postage-stamp size chip delivering supercomputer performance using a process that mimics the human brain.

The so-called “neurosynaptic” chip is a breakthrough that opens a wide new range of computing possibilities from self-driving cars to artificial intelligence systems that can installed on a smartphone, the scientists say.
The researchers from IBM, Cornell Tech and collaborators from around the world said they took an entirely new approach in design compared with previous computer architecture, moving toward a system called “cognitive computing.”
"We have taken inspiration from the cerebral cortex to design this chip," said IBM chief scientist for brain-inspired computing, Dharmendra Modha, referring to the command center of the brain.
Read moreneurosciencestuff:

Tiny chip mimics brain, delivers supercomputer speed
Researchers Thursday unveiled a powerful new postage-stamp size chip delivering supercomputer performance using a process that mimics the human brain.

The so-called “neurosynaptic” chip is a breakthrough that opens a wide new range of computing possibilities from self-driving cars to artificial intelligence systems that can installed on a smartphone, the scientists say.
The researchers from IBM, Cornell Tech and collaborators from around the world said they took an entirely new approach in design compared with previous computer architecture, moving toward a system called “cognitive computing.”
"We have taken inspiration from the cerebral cortex to design this chip," said IBM chief scientist for brain-inspired computing, Dharmendra Modha, referring to the command center of the brain.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Tiny chip mimics brain, delivers supercomputer speed

Researchers Thursday unveiled a powerful new postage-stamp size chip delivering supercomputer performance using a process that mimics the human brain.

The so-called “neurosynaptic” chip is a breakthrough that opens a wide new range of computing possibilities from self-driving cars to artificial intelligence systems that can installed on a smartphone, the scientists say.

The researchers from IBM, Cornell Tech and collaborators from around the world said they took an entirely new approach in design compared with previous computer architecture, moving toward a system called “cognitive computing.”

"We have taken inspiration from the cerebral cortex to design this chip," said IBM chief scientist for brain-inspired computing, Dharmendra Modha, referring to the command center of the brain.

Read more


link: ( http://g-sin.tumblr.com )